Thursday, August 27, 2015

The STALL data filter

Currently, Kronometrix, is supporting two types of raw data filters: the STALL and RANGE filters.

A raw data filter is a mechanism to ensure that incoming raw data follows certain rules or conditions before the numerical processing and data visualization, within Kronometrix. For example the STALL filter will ensure raw data is properly arriving to our appliance and there are no delays. The RANGE filter, will ensure incoming raw data is sane and valid, and stays within certain range of values. For example the air temperature is valid as long as it is between -50C to 50C or the CPU Utilization of a Windows server is between 0 and 100%.


The STALL Filter

Defined under messages.json and part of the Library of Monitoring Objects, the STALL filter is part of the data message definition. For example this is the way to define the STALL for a data message, called sysrec, which belongs to a data source type: Linux (a computer system running Linux CentOS operating system). 

stall: seconds

The STALL filter, is defined in seconds, describing the time spent before triggering a STALL warning under Kronometrix event management console:



Turn them off

Starting with Kronometrix 1.2 we are able to turn ON/OFF, per subscription the STALL detector. That means if we have several data subscriptions, we can say for what subscriptions the filter should be ON or OFF, no matter what the messages.json will have configured.

See here:



dcsim and mix subscriptions require some updates, some computer systems will need some maintenance work and during this period of time we dont want to receive warnings and alerts from any sources which belong to these two subscriptions. So we turned OFF the STALL filters for these two subscriptions.


Why STALL filter is important and you should use it

  • because we want to see and get notified when we are not receiving data from sensors, computer hosts, weather stations, etc
  • we want to keep a close look how often data is missing or is delayed
  • because we are forced by regulations and laws to monitor and report these delays (example, Airports, Air Traffic Controller)

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